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Prakash Malani

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A portlet is a Web component that generates fragments - pieces of markup (e.g., HTML, XML) adhering to certain specifications. Fragments are aggregated to form a complete document. This article introduces the Java Specification Request (JSR) 168 on Java Portlets. It illustrates the creation of Java Portlets using BEA WebLogic Workshop 8.1 SP2 and the deployment of these portlets on BEA WebLogic Portal 8.1 SP2. I'll look at essential concepts such as portal, desktop, and portlets and describe in detail the various portlet modes and window states. I'll also look at designing, implementing, configuring, and executing portlets with Workshop. JSR 168 defines the specification for Java Portlets. A portal is a Web application and an aggregation of portlets. A portlet container runs portlets and manages their life cycle. JSR 168 defines the contract between a portlet and ... (more)

Considering MySQL? Read On... (Part 2)

Read part one of this 2-part article This article explores using MySQL as the database engine where the application is developed using BEA WebLogic Workshop 8.1 and deployed to BEA WebLogic Server 8.1. Using an archetypical J2EE architecture, I evaluate the impact of using MySQL from various aspects such as choosing the correct version of MySQL, setting-up the server, and making development adjustments. The information presented here not only enhances the readers' understanding of the tools and technologies utilized, but also saves countless hours. Even readers who employ differe... (more)

Considering MySQL? Read On... (Part I)

Read Part 2 of this 2-part article MySQL is a small, fast, and efficient database. This article discusses leveraging MySQL as the database with BEA WebLogic Server 8.1. We will look at using MySQL as the database engine where the application is developed using BEA WebLogic Workshop 8.1 and deployed to BEA WebLogic Server 8.1. Using an archetypical Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) architecture, I will evaluate the impact of using MySQL from various aspects such as choosing the correct version of MySQL, setting up the server, and making development adjustments. The impact on develop... (more)

Strategies for WebLogic Domain Configuration

In my previous article (WLDJ, Vol. 3, issue 8), I gave you a detailed overview of the different strategies available for domain creation and configuration and evaluated manual and templating options. In this article, I employ tools like WLShell, WebLogic Scripting Tool, Silent Scripts, and Ant for domain configuration. These tools leverage simple, high-level scripting languages. Note: This article relies heavily on the common steps such as Domain Creation, Database Configuration, and Verifying the Domain Configu-ration described in part 1. Scripting Language There are many ques... (more)

Strategies for WebLogic Domain Configuration

A domain contains configuration information for a BEA WebLogic Server instance. It has configuration information about servers, clusters, and machines. A domain also contains configuration information about resources such as Java DataBase Connectivity (JDBC) connection pools, JDBC data sources, connection factories, and Java Message Service (JMS) queues. In addition, it contains configuration information about the applications deployed to the instance. The domain configuration information is persisted in a config.xml file. In this article, I evaluate various strategies for WebL... (more)